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Weight Before Pregnancy Matters


Most women know that pregnancy nutrition is essential to a healthy pregnancy and birth, but weight before you conceive is also important. If you are underweight or overweight, you can face a number of fertility problems and complications.

If a woman is underweight, she may suffer from irregular periods or stop menstruating until her weight returns to a normal level. If she is too thin when she conceives, her baby may be born with fetal growth restriction, which means a low birth weight and an increased risk of neurological defects. If a woman is underweight during pregnancy, her baby will take the nutrients he or she needs from the mother's body, and she will be left feeling fatigued and nauseous.

Being overweight is just as risky for women of childbearing age. Obesity is a common problem in developing countries about 40 percent of women aged 15 to 49 (who aren't pregnant) in the US are overweight. Obese women often have fertility problems, as well as complications during pregnancy like diabetes and heart disease. It can prevent a woman from breastfeeding as lactation is impaired. Later in life, obesity can lead to a number of health problems such as heart disease and stroke.

You need to be at a healthy weight before you get pregnant, and this starts by monitoring your body weight before you get pregnant. Calculate your body fat using the body mass index (BMI). Once you become pregnant, you need to make sure that you're gaining the recommended amount of weight around 25 pounds. If you are carrying multiples or have other health complications, your doctor may advise you to gain more weight. However, you should never limit nutrients or go on a diet when you're pregnant as this can be dangerous to your health and the health of your baby.

To get the most out of your pre-pregnancy diet, eat a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and fish, and low fat dairy products. Limit fat and sugar consumption eat sweets in moderation.

Exercise is necessary for optimal health, and if you're planning a pregnancy, a fitness routine can help increase fertility and prepare your body for pregnancy and childbirth. Usually, it's fine to continue with the same exercise routine that you do on a regular basis, as long as it's not too strenuous or causing you to lose too much body weight.

 


 
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