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Tracking Vaccines

Tracking Vaccines


With so many infant vaccines that are necessary for your baby's health, it can be very difficult to keep track of them all. Did she get her rubella vaccine last month, or was that for hepatitis A? In some cases, there may be a shortage of vaccines in certain areas, so scheduled immunizations can be delayed. Although your baby's doctor can advise you on what shots are needed when, it's still up to you to make sure that your baby is up-to-date with her shots. Here is a basic schedule of when the required vaccines are needed:

Hepatitis B: At birth, one to two months of age, and between six and eighteen months.

Rotavirus: At two, four and six months of age.

Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DtaP): At two, four and six months again, and again between fifteen and eighteen months and four to six years.

Haemophilus Influenza (HIB): This immunization is given at two, four, six, twelve, and fifteen and again between eighteen months and five years of age.

Pneumococcal (PCV): Your baby will receive a PCB vaccination at two, four and six months, sometime between twelve and fifteen months, and finally between two and six years.

Polio (IPV): Given at two and four months of age, between six and eighteen months, and four to six years.

Influenza: Once each year, beginning at six months, up until age six.

Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR): At twelve to fifteen months, and two to three years.

Varicella: A varicella shot is necessary at sometime between twelve and fifteen months, and also four to six years.

Hepatitis A: This immunization comes in two doses, given when your baby is between twelve and twenty-three months.

Meningitis: Meningitis shots are given once between the ages of two and six years of age, but usually only when your infant is considered high risk.

You can easily find immunization charts from your local clinic or health care provider. A schedule can help busy moms keep track of all of the necessary vaccines that their infant requires up until the age of six. Timing your baby's vaccines is necessary as it's crucial that she gets the proper doses at the right times. Infant vaccines will allow your child to develop an immunity to dangerous childhood diseases, so ensure that you keep her immunization chart current.

You also need to let your child's doctor know about any medications she is taking, as these can cause reactions to certain immunizations. It's normal for your child to develop a fever or be tired or fussy after immunizations. This is a normal side effect of baby shots, however, if you notice your child displaying a severe reaction to the vaccine, alert your doctor right away. This could be an indication of an allergy to the immunization, and could affect the schedule of future vaccinations for your baby.

 


 
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